The James Beard Cookbook Award Winners Just Announced

THE JAMES BEARD COOKBOOK AWARD WINNERS JUST ANNOUNCED

Here’s a list of winners in all delicious categories:
Cookbook Hall of Fame: Barbara Kafka
Cookbook of the Year: “Yucatán: Recipes from a Culinary Expedition” by David Sterling
American Cooking: “Heritage” by Sean Brock
Baking and Dessert: “Flavor Flours: A New Way to Bake with Teff, Buckwheat, Sorghum, Other Whole & Ancient Grains, Nuts & Non-Wheat Flours” by Alice Medrich
Beverage: “Liquid Intelligence: The Art and Science of the Perfect Cocktail” by Dave Arnold
Cooking from a Professional Point of View: “Bar Tartine: Techniques & Recipes” by Nicolaus Balla and Cortney Burns
Focus on Health: “Cooking Light Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Food Taste Amazing” by
Keith Schroeder
General Cooking: “The Kitchen Cookbook: Recipes, Kitchens & Tips to Inspire Your Cooking” by Faith Durand and Sara Kate Gillingham
Photography: “In Her Kitchen: Stories and Recipes from Grandmas Around the World” by Gabriele Galimberti

Green Eggs And Ham Coming To Netflix

GREEN EGGS AND HAM COMING TO NETFLIX

Netflix is cooking up “Green Eggs and Ham” with help from the estate of Dr. Seuss, executive producer Ellen DeGeneres and Warner Bros. TV Group. A 13-episode animated TV series will be adapted from the classic 1960 children’s book, continuing the adventures of some of its characters.

Cindy Holland, Netflix’s VP of original content, channeled Dr. Seuss’ famous meter in announcing the deal:

“We think this will be a hit
Green Eggs and Ham is a perfect fit
for our growing slate of amazing stories
available exclusively in all Netflix territories.
You can stream it on a phone.
You can stream it on your own.
You can stream it on TV.
You can stream it globally.”

Summer Reading ~ Show June 27 and 28

FEATURED BOOKS PREVIEWED

“In The Unlikely Event” by Judy Blume
“Solitude Creek” by Jeffery Deaver
“The Rumor” by Elin Hilderbrand
“On The Move” by Oliver Sacks
“A God In Ruins” by Kate Atkinson
“Missoula” by Jon Krakauer
“The Knockoff” by Lucy Sykes and Jo Piazza

INTERVIEW
Jeffery Deaver, Author

TUNE INTO THE PROGRAM FOR
A look at new titles from favorite authors –just in time for our summer reading pleasure. We wanted more…and here they are! Elaine speaks with Jeffery Deaver about his new Kathryn Dance thriller – a story that grabs you from Page One.

Stephen King Wins The Edgar Award

Master of horror Stephen King has won America’s top crime-writing award for his serial killer thriller “Mr Mercedes.” The novel sees King steer clear of paranormal elements to focus on a very human evil. The book beat titles by more traditional practitioners of crime writing including Ian Rankin, Stuart Neville and Karin Slaughter was named best novel at the Edgar Awards in New York at the end of April.

“He represents a plausible evil; it’s impossible not to hear echoes in his story of other troubled young American men who have opened fire in crowded schools or cinemas, as King peels back the layers to understand how a killer like Brady is formed,” said the Observer review of the novel.

Run by the Mystery Writers of America, the Edgars, named for Edgar Allan Poe, have been running for over 60 years, with the best novel prize won in the past by Patricia Highsmith, John le Carré and Raymond Chandler.

“Well, on the minus side I didn’t win the Edgar award – some young ruffian called Stephen King did. On the plus side … I got to meet Mr King,” tweeted Rankin after King’s win. The Scottish writer had been shortlisted for “Saints of the Shadow Bible,” part of his series of crime novels about the detective John Rebus. Neville, shortlisted for “The Final Silence,” in which a woman discovers a catalogue of victims in her late uncle’s house, wrote on Twitter: “I didn’t win the Edgar, but I got to meet @StephenKing, who was very gracious in tolerating my fawning.”

The best first novel by an American author award went to “Dry Bones in the Valley” by Tom Bouman. Gillian Flynn, author of “Gone Girl,” took the best short story prize for “What Do You Do,” from the Rogues anthology. The ceremony also saw James Ellroy and Lois Duncan named grand masters, an honor the Mystery Writers of America says represents “the pinnacle of achievement in mystery writing”.

Listen to The Book Report at your convenience. Go to https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-book-report/id540205917?mt=2, or at bookreportradio.com, click on Archived Shows

Ruth Rendell Dies At Age 85

Ruth Rendell, one of Britain’s best-loved authors, who delighted fans for decades with her dark, intricately plotted crime novels, passed away on May 2. Baroness Rendell of Babergh, the creator of Inspector Wexford and author of more than 60 novels, had been admitted to hospital after a serious stroke in January and died in London.

The crime writer Val McDermid voiced the sorrow of many Rendell fans when she heard the news. “Ruth Rendell was unique. No one can equal her range or her accomplishment; no one has earned more respect from her fellow practitioners. Current British crime writing owes much to a writer who over a 50-year career consistently demonstrated that the genre can continually reinvent itself, moving in new directions, assuming new concerns and exploring new ways of telling stories.”

Baroness Gail Rebuck, chair of Penguin Random House UK, said: “Ruth was much admired by the whole publishing industry for her brilliant body of
work. An insightful and elegant observer of society, many of her award-winning thrillers and psychological murder mysteries highlighted the causes she cared so deeply about. She was a great writer, a campaigner for social justice, a proud mother and grandmother, a generous and loyal friend and probably the best read person I have ever met. Her many close friends in publishing and the House of Lords will greatly miss her wonderful company and her truly unique contribution to our lives.”

Rendell’s novels included the Inspector Wexford crime series and the psychological thrillers she wrote as Barbara Vine. Her debut, “From Doon with Death,” introduced Wexford in 1964. “He sort of is me, although not entirely,” the author told the Observer in 2013 when the inspector made his 24th outing, in “No Man’s Nightingale.” “Wexford holds my views pretty well on most things, so I find putting him on the page fairly easy.”

Rendell landed her £75 publishing deal after a decade of life as a mother and housewife. She had been a journalist on the Chigwell Times, but resigned after it emerged that her report of a local tennis club dinner had been written without attending the event, meaning she missed the death of the after-dinner speaker during his speech.

Ian Rankin said he’d viewed Rendell as “probably the greatest living crime writer” and added that “if crime fiction is currently in rude good health, its practitioners striving to better the craft and keep it fresh, vibrant and relevant, this is in no small part thanks to Ruth Rendell”.

Rendell’s death closely follows that of fellow crime writer PD James, her good friend and political opponent in the House of Lords. A tribute by the broadcaster and writer Mark Lawson this weekend called them “the George Eliot and Jane Austen of the homicidal novel: different minds and style but equal talent”. He credited them with saving British detective fiction from the disdain of serious literary critics.

Rendell won prizes including the Crime Writers’ Association Cartier Diamond Dagger for “sustained excellence in crime writing”, and, as a Labour life peer, helped pass a law preventing girls being sent abroad for female genital mutilation.

Listen to The Book Report at your convenience. Go to https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-book-report/id540205917?mt=2, or at bookreportradio.com, click on Archived Shows

Mystery Writers Cooking Up New Recipes

MYSTERY WRITERS COOKING UP NEW RECIPES

In two new books, mystery writers have come together to provide recipes from their lives, and the lives of their characters.

The first book, The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook: Wickedly Good Meals and Desserts to Die For was released in March. Edited by Kate White, author of the “Bailey Weggins” series of mystery books, the work brings together recipes from Lee Child, Mary Higgins Clark, Harlan Coben, Gillian Flynn, Sue Grafton, Charlaine Harris, James Patterson, Louise Penny and Scott Turow, among others.

White, a member of Mystery Writers of America, was approached by the organization to see if she would be open to editing a cookbook featuring recipes from other members. Because of her editing chops — (White is the former editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan magazine) — the group figured she would know how to pull a collection together. “But what amused me is that one of the committee members had read my “Bailey Weggins” mysteries and pointed out that I had a lot of food mentions in the series and thus was probably a foodie,” added White. “I don’t think I realized until then how much Bailey ate!”

The book includes Mary Higgins Clark’s recipe for Celebratory Game Night Chili, a dish she and her family eat while watching the Giants. And Sandra Brown’s “Mystery Crackers” are from a recipe given to her by Mary Lynn Baxter, an indie bookstore owner in Texas, who read her first manuscript years ago and sent it to an editor who bought it. Other recipes are for dishes mentioned in actual mysteries—Sara Paretsky’s “Chicken Gabriella” is cherished by her detective V.I. Warshawski (whose mother’s name is Gabriella).

But one of White’s favorite recipes is Nelson DeMille’s Male Chauvinist Pigs in the Blanket. “It’s not from a book, but it’s hilarious and you get such a sense of Nelson from just reading it,” said White. “It makes you want to go out and buy all his books.”

White approached some of the biggest authors directly, but all Mystery Writers of America members were asked to submit recipes. She then worked with the editors to make the final selections. “We wanted to be sure we had a great cross section,” added White.

“Food can play a big role in mysteries,” said White. “In certain instances, like in the classic story “Lamb to the Slaughter” by Roald Dahl, food is an actual murder weapon.” Food, according to White, also works to “brilliantly define” character. “For instance, we can’t think of Miss Marple without her scones and tea—she reportedly drank 143 cups of tea over the course of all those novels and short stories,” said White. “And where would Lee Child’s Jack Reacher be without his coffee?”

In The Cozy Cookbook: More than 100 Recipes from Today’s Bestselling Mystery Authors, editors at Berkley Prime Crime culled together dishes featured in the imprint’s many culinary-series, like Avery James’s “Cheese Shop” mysteries, Laura Childs “Tea Shop” mysteries, and Victoria Hamilton’s “Vintage Kitchen” mysteries.

“So many of our Prime Crime mysteries contain fun extras like crafting tips or recipes,” said Berkley editor Michelle Vega. “It seemed like a natural fit for our audience and also seemed like something that would potentially engage food lovers who may not be familiar with our books.”

Listen to The Book Report at your convenience. Go to https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-book-report/id540205917?mt=2, or at bookreportradio.com, click on Archived Shows

Father’s Day ~ show June 20 and 21

FEATURED BOOKS PREVIEWED

“The Forgotten Room” by Lincoln Child
“The Wright Brothers” by David McCullough
“Dry Bones” by Craig Johnson
“Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty” by Charles Leerhsen
“Gathering Prey” by John Sandford
“Target Tokyo: Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid That Avenged Pearl Harbor” by James Scott
“Someone Could Get Hurt” by Drew Magary

INTERVIEW
Craig Johnson, Author

TUNE INTO THE PROGRAM FOR
A fitting tribute for Father’s Day – a literary look at the “Strong, Silent Type.” You’re sure to find the perfect gift in this diverse selection of titles. Elaine speaks with Craig Johnson to get the latest on his popular Sheriff Walt Longmire.

Listen to The Book Report at your convenience. Go to https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-book-report/id540205917?mt=2, or at bookreportradio.com, click on Archived Shows