Cops and Private Eyes ~ Show September 12 and 13

FEATURED BOOKS PREVIEWED

“Black” by Russell Blake
“Pretty Girls” by Karin Slaughter
“Brush Back” by Sara Paretsky
“Cross and Burn” by Val McDermid
“X” by Sue Grafton
“Dexter is Dead” by Jeff Lindsay
“Bum Rap” by Paul Levine

INTERVIEW
Sara Paretsky, Author

TUNE IN TO THE PROGRAM FOR
An arresting mix of new titles with amateur sleuths, private eyes and cops in the line up. Sara Paretsky drops by to speak about her newest title in the VI Warshawski series, “Brush Back.”

Listen to The Book Report at your convenience. Go to https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-book-report/id540205917?mt=2, or at bookreportradio.com, click on Archived Shows

Ruth Rendell Dies At Age 85

Ruth Rendell, one of Britain’s best-loved authors, who delighted fans for decades with her dark, intricately plotted crime novels, passed away on May 2. Baroness Rendell of Babergh, the creator of Inspector Wexford and author of more than 60 novels, had been admitted to hospital after a serious stroke in January and died in London.

The crime writer Val McDermid voiced the sorrow of many Rendell fans when she heard the news. “Ruth Rendell was unique. No one can equal her range or her accomplishment; no one has earned more respect from her fellow practitioners. Current British crime writing owes much to a writer who over a 50-year career consistently demonstrated that the genre can continually reinvent itself, moving in new directions, assuming new concerns and exploring new ways of telling stories.”

Baroness Gail Rebuck, chair of Penguin Random House UK, said: “Ruth was much admired by the whole publishing industry for her brilliant body of
work. An insightful and elegant observer of society, many of her award-winning thrillers and psychological murder mysteries highlighted the causes she cared so deeply about. She was a great writer, a campaigner for social justice, a proud mother and grandmother, a generous and loyal friend and probably the best read person I have ever met. Her many close friends in publishing and the House of Lords will greatly miss her wonderful company and her truly unique contribution to our lives.”

Rendell’s novels included the Inspector Wexford crime series and the psychological thrillers she wrote as Barbara Vine. Her debut, “From Doon with Death,” introduced Wexford in 1964. “He sort of is me, although not entirely,” the author told the Observer in 2013 when the inspector made his 24th outing, in “No Man’s Nightingale.” “Wexford holds my views pretty well on most things, so I find putting him on the page fairly easy.”

Rendell landed her £75 publishing deal after a decade of life as a mother and housewife. She had been a journalist on the Chigwell Times, but resigned after it emerged that her report of a local tennis club dinner had been written without attending the event, meaning she missed the death of the after-dinner speaker during his speech.

Ian Rankin said he’d viewed Rendell as “probably the greatest living crime writer” and added that “if crime fiction is currently in rude good health, its practitioners striving to better the craft and keep it fresh, vibrant and relevant, this is in no small part thanks to Ruth Rendell”.

Rendell’s death closely follows that of fellow crime writer PD James, her good friend and political opponent in the House of Lords. A tribute by the broadcaster and writer Mark Lawson this weekend called them “the George Eliot and Jane Austen of the homicidal novel: different minds and style but equal talent”. He credited them with saving British detective fiction from the disdain of serious literary critics.

Rendell won prizes including the Crime Writers’ Association Cartier Diamond Dagger for “sustained excellence in crime writing”, and, as a Labour life peer, helped pass a law preventing girls being sent abroad for female genital mutilation.

Listen to The Book Report at your convenience. Go to https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-book-report/id540205917?mt=2, or at bookreportradio.com, click on Archived Shows

We’re Up For An International Crime Spree ~ Show March 14 and 15

FEATURED BOOKS PREVIEWED

“On A Fine Summer’s Day” by Charles Todd
“Burned” by Valerie Plame
“Why Kings Confess” by C S Harris
“Runaway” by Peter May
“A Conspiracy of Faith” by Jussi Adler-Olsen
“The Forgotten Girls” by Sara Blaedel
“The Final Silence” by Stuart Neville

INTERVIEW
Valerie Plame, Author

TUNE INTO THE PROGRAM FOR
It’s the Ides of March… and with a nefarious nod toward Caesar, we’ve got murder on our minds. We’re up for an international crime spree, highlighted by my guest today, Valerie Plame, a former CIA operative.

Listen to The Book Report at your convenience. Go to https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-book-report/id540205917?mt=2, or at bookreportradio.com, click on Archived Shows

A Show That Proves That Crime Does Pay ~ Oct 18th and 19th

“The Long Way Home” by Louise Penny
“Mean Streak” by Sandra Brown
“The Marco Effect: Department Q, Book 5” by Jussi Adler-Olsen
“The Stone Wife” by Peter Lovesey
“Deadline” by John Sandford
“The Perfect Witness” by Iris Johansen
“A Thin Dark Line” by Tami Hoag

INTERVIEW
Sandra Brown, Author

TUNE IN TO THE PROGRAM FOR
A show that proves that crime does pay…when you’re looking for a book to keep you turning those pages. Elaine speaks with bestselling author Sandra Brown about her newest thriller, “Mean Streak.”

WONDERING ABOUT STEPHEN KING’S NEWEST, MR MERCEDES?

WONDERING ABOUT STEPHEN KING’S NEWEST, MR MERCEDES?

In this suspenseful crime thriller, ex-detective Bill Hodges is settling badly into his retirement. Then he receives a taunting letter from someone who claims to be the Mercedes Killer—the media’s name for the hit-and-run driver who, a year earlier, deliberately plowed a stolen car into a crowd at a job fair, killing eight and maiming 15. Hoping to wrap up the unsolved case, Hodges follows the letter writer to an anonymous social media chat site, inaugurating a game of cat and mouse with escalating stakes and potentially fatal consequences. Bill’s antagonist is Brady Hartsfield, a sociopath who is skilled in computers and electronics and who—with a touch of brilliant irony—also operates the neighborhood ice cream truck. Coincidence and luck figure significantly in the final outcome, but King excels in his disturbing portrait of Brady, a genuine monster in ordinary human form who gives new meaning to the phrase “the banality of evil.”